Ancient Art Antiquities

Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure

Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure

Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure    Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure
Ancient Greek Vase Museum Replica South Italian Red-figure Style Painting. The reproduction is a stunning work of art, is created with the same eye for quality as the original, in same shape, size and dimensions from a craftsman who not only mastered the ancient techniques of producing red-figure pottery, but had a deep historical and archaeological knowledge of the original pictorial styles used in Southern Italy in 5th and 4th century BC. The piece is not a cheaply replica made of resin with printed drawings like most of the other replicas for sale, this vessel is made of clay, handmade and hand-painted in exquisite details, hard to distinguish from the originals.

So do not expect "perfection", this clay vase is not mass produced from a machine, it have some chips, paint dings or other small defects. The vase has been restored, but this simply adds a touch of authenticity to this reproduction.

Made in Italy - 1990s Height ca. You must return an item in the same condition as it was received, not altered in any way. Red-figure pottery Red-figure vase painting is one of the most important styles of figural Greek vase painting. It developed in Athens around 520 BC and remained in use until the late 3rd century BC. It replaced the previously dominant style of black-figure vase painting within a few decades. Its modern name is based on the figural depictions in red colour on a black background, in contrast to the preceding black-figure style with black figures on a red background. The most important areas of production, apart from Attica, were in Southern Italy. The style was also adopted in other parts of Greece. Etruria became an important centre of production outside the Greek World. Attic red-figure vases were exported throughout Greece and beyond. For a long time, they dominated the market for fine ceramics.

Only few centres of pottery production could compete with Athens in terms of innovation, quality and production capacity. Of the red figure vases produced in Athens alone, more than 40,000 specimens and fragments survive today. From the second most important production centre, Southern Italy, more than 20,000 vases and fragments are preserved.

Starting with the studies by John D. Beazley and Arthur Dale Trendall, the study of this style of art has made enormous progress. Some vases can be ascribed to individual artists or schools. The images provide evidence for the exploration of Greek cultural history, everyday life, iconography, and mythology.

Apulian vase painting Apulian vase painting was the leading South Italian vase painting tradition between 430 and 300 BC. Of the circa 20,000 surviving specimens of Italian red-figure vases, about half are from Apulian production, while the rest are from the four other centres of production, Paestum, Campania, Lucania and Sicily. The main production centre for Apulian vases was at Taras, the only large Greek polis in Apulia. Two styles, the "Plain Style" and the "Ornate Style" (sometimes "Rich Style") are distinguished.

The first largely eschews additional colouring and was mostly used for the decoration of bell kraters, colonet kraters and smaller vessels. Their decoration is quite simple, the pictorial compositions usually include one to four figures e.

Works by Sisyphus Painter, Tarporley Painter. The motifs focus on mythical subjects, but also include women's heads, warriors in scenes of battle or departure, and dionysiac thiasos imagery. The backs usually have images of cloaked youths.

After the middle of the fourth century, the simple style became increasingly similar to the ornate one see, e. The artists of the Ornate Style preferred bigger vessels with space for larger images, such as volute kraters, amphorae, loutrophoroi and hydriai.

Compositions contained up to 20 figures, often arranged in two or more registers. The figures frequently appear to be floating. Colouring was used copiously, especially red, gold/yellow and white.

While ornamentation had originally been relatively simple, from the mid-fourth century BC onwards, painters increasingly placed rich vegetal ornaments, especially on the necks and sides of vases. At the same time, simple perspective depictions of architecture, especially of "Underworld Palaces" (naiskoi) became common. From about 360 BC, a common motif was grave scenes showing individuals performing offerings at a stylised grave or pillar.

Important representatives painters include the Ilioupersis Painter, the Darius Painter and the Baltimore Painter. Popular mythological motifs include the Assembly of the Gods, the amazonomachy, Bellerophon, Heracles, and events of the Trojan War.

There are also many individual depictions of myths that are not commonly depicted elsewhere. Many scenes have dionysiac or aphrodisiac themes, probably directly connected to funerary traditions and grave cults (many of the vases were made as grave offerings). Ideas of an afterlife are frequently implied or expressed by such paintings. The motif of women's heads growing out of flowers or between tendrils belongs to the same context. Sometimes, the women's heads are replaced by that of Pan, Hermes or foreigners. In the second half of the fourth century, depictions of weddings, women and erotic motifs become more common. Apulian vases also occasionally depict theatrical scenes, which are also known from the other South Italian traditions, but absent in Attica.

These include motifs from dramatic theatre as well as farce (phlyax play). In contrast, scenes of everyday life and athletic motifs disappear from the repertoire nearly totally after 370 BC. The Apulian vase painters had considerable influence on the painters of the other South Italian traditions. Some of them appear to have moved to cities other than Taras, such as Canosa.

Apart from red-figure pottery, black-glazed vases with painted decoration (Gnathian vases) and polychrome vases (Canosan vases) were also produced. The South Italian clays are less rich in iron than the Attic ones. As a result, the clay would not reach the rich red known from Attic red-figure vases. This was compensated by the addition of slips of light ochre clay before firing, which also produced smoother surfaces. South Italian ancient Greek pottery South Italian is a designation for ancient Greek pottery fabricated in Magna Graecia largely during the 4th century BC.

The fact that Greek Southern Italy produced its own red-figure pottery as early as the end of the 5th century B. Was first established by Adolf Furtwaengler in 1893 A. Prior to that this pottery had been first designated as "Etruscan" and then as Attic. Archaeological proof that this pottery was actually being produced in South Italy first came in 1973 when a workshop and kilns with misfirings and broken wares was first excavated at Metaponto, proving that the Amykos Painter was located there rather than in Athens A. The interchange of iconography, techniques, and ideas between the major pottery centers of the Hellenistic Period was formidable.

One can see the influences of Corinth, Athens, Etruria, and cross pollination throughout the fabrics of Magna Graecia. There are five regions which produced South Italian ware: Apulia, Lucania, Paestum, Campania, and Sicily. These regions, in turn, had various workshops within them.

Apulian ware was almost all made in various workshops in Taras (Taranto). Lucanian ware was made in Heraklea and Metaponto.

Paestan ware was all made in Poseidonia (Paestum). Campanian ware was made in Capua and Kyme (Cumae). Sicilian ware was made in Syracuse and Lipari. Later centers also developed in Teano (Campania), Canosa (Apulia), and Gnathia (Apulia), but these potteries are moving away from Classical red figure towards the less figurative work of the later Hellenistic and Graeco-Roman Periods.

All South Italian fabrics were originally scions from the Attic workshops of Athens, when artists began to leave that city following the Peloponnesian Wars. The earliest workshops seem to have been founded in Lucania, and Apulia.

Others were founded in Sicily, and then scions from the Sicilian workshops established those in Paestum and Campania. South Italian ware illustrates many ancient Greek dramas and myths which are unknown in Mainland Greek pottery fabrics like those of Athens (Attic ware), Sparta (Laconian ware), and Corinth (Corinthian ware). Almost all of the pottery forms developed in Greece were also produced in South Italy. However, South Italian potters developed some of these traditional forms in new directions. For instance, Apulian potters take the volute krater and loutrophoros to new heights of fancy, making them far more elaborate than their Athenian forerunners. Apulian potters, having a taste for the frilly and elaborate, take traditional forms such as the Panathenaic amphora, the oinochoe, the lekythos, attenuate their forms, exaggerate their flares, add volute handles, molded gorgonions, affectionately dubbed "macaroons", and end up with extremely elegant new varieties of pottery which still fit within the Hellenistic aesthetic, and end up becoming standard in the subsequent Graeco-Roman world. New Italiote forms come about through experimentation and borrowing from local Italic cultures. In Campania, the bail amphora was invented. This is an amphora shape which has a single handle across the mouth rather than the usual double handles on the neck or shoulder. Local Italic forms made by native peoples were also borrowed into the South Italian repertoire. The Messapian trozzella is borrowed and becomes the nestoris, an elaborate form having a large belly, a pair of lug handles, a pair of neck to shoulder handles, and molded rosettes. Some elements of decoration were also innovative. Apulian artists use polychromatic, coiling tendrils and flower forms including roses, poppies, and whirling swirls to fill necks and other traditionally black areas of vases. Frequent use is made of portrait or cameo faces of nymphs and satyrs. Rosettes, vine leaves, and other fillers get more and more elaborate.

Italiote artists also created a technique called "sovradipinto, " in which multiple layers of colored slips were used to add chiaroscuro (highlight and lowlight) for figures and decorations. The Campanian artists seem to have favored the use of a broader palette of colors than the other fabrics, often making female figures with white skin, while leaving male figures in red, and then adding lots of purple red, yellow, and white details all over the vases. Italiote artists were also extremely adept at using the false red figure technique, also known as Six's technique. This is the application of red and white slips on top of the black gloss rather than leaving figures and designs in reserve, as was the usual Athenian custom.

This technique was also very popular in Etruria and may hail from that region. The item "Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure" is in sale since Friday, December 13, 2019. This item is in the category "Antiques\Reproduction Antiques". The seller is "spatheia" and is located in Italy. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Product: Vase
  • Primary Material: Ceramic, Porcelain

Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure    Greek Vase Museum Replica Amphora Ancient Art Attic Etruscan Roman Red Figure